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Proposals by topic

  1. Proposal 1 Embed the Healthy Streets Approach in transport planning and delivery

    We will ensure that the Healthy Streets Approach is embedded in our transport planning and the design and delivery of projects by:

    • Using the Healthy Streets Approach to inform decision making and understand what people think about the City’s streets
    • Using the Healthy Streets Check for Designers to assess projects that will have a significant impact on people’s experience of using the City’s streets
    • Assessing planning applications against the Healthy Streets Indicators

    We will ensure that the Healthy Streets Approach is embedded in our transport planning and the design and delivery of projects by:

    • Using the Healthy Streets Approach to inform strategic decision making and project prioritisation
    • Using the Healthy Streets Check for Designers to assess proposals for projects that will have a significant impact on people’s experience of using the City’s streets and publishing the results
    • Assessing planning applications against the Healthy Streets Indicators and requiring the use of the Healthy Streets Check for Designers on all developments that will have a significant impact on surrounding streets
    • Assessing the health impacts of projects as part of the design process and post-implementation monitoring
    • Including questions relating to the Healthy Streets Indicators in project monitoring and public perceptions surveys
    Healthy Streets Indicators (Source: Lucy Saunders)

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  2. Proposal 2 Put the needs of people walking first when designing and managing our streets

    Key proposal

    We will ensure that the needs of people walking are prioritised in the Square Mile, accepting that delivering this may result in delays or reduced capacity for other street users. Measures to achieve this include:

    • Improving the experience for people walking City-wide by widening pavements, making streets easier to cross and reducing the amount of time people wait at pedestrian crossings
    • Creating new pedestrian priority streets, increasing the amount from 25 kilometres at present (mainly alleyways and high walks), to 35 kilometres by 2030 and at least 55 kilometres by 2044. This will be done by making streets either access only for motor vehicles, fully pedestrianised or closed to motor vehicles at certain times of the day

    We will ensure that the needs of people walking are prioritised by:

    • Applying the Healthy Streets Approach (Proposal 1) and considering the needs of people walking first when delivering changes to streets
    • Accepting that delivering priority for people walking may result in delays or reduced capacity for other street users, while seeking to minimise the impact on essential traffic through general traffic reduction (Proposal 11)
    • Increasing the number of pedestrianised or pedestrian priority streets from 25 kilometres at present, to 35 kilometres by 2030. By 2044, at least 55 kilometres will be pedestrian priority, equating to half of all streets (by length)
    • Making streets easier to cross and giving people on foot greater priority at the entrances to side streets
    • Widening pavements to provide more space for people walking, with the aim that all pavements will have a minimum Pedestrian Comfort Level of B+

    Pedestrian Comfort Levels

    Pedestrian Comfort Levels are used to assess the level of crowding on a pavement or at a pedestrian crossing. The level of comfort, which is graded between A+ (most comfortable) and E (least comfortable), is based on the number of people walking and the space available, taking account of street furniture and other restrictions.

    Transport for London’s Pedestrian Comfort Guidance recommends a minimum comfort level of B+. This provides enough space for people to feel comfortable when walking at a typical pace and for them to be able to choose where to walk. Below this level, conflicts between people walking become frequent, walking is increasingly uncomfortable and frustrating and can lead to people stepping into the carriageway.

    Key walking routes

    We will prioritise improvements to junctions and routes that are busiest with people walking and where pavement width and pedestrian crossings are inadequate for current or forecast demand. Improvements to the following routes and junctions will be delivered by 2030 to make walking quicker, safer and more comfortable:

    • The area around Moorgate and Liverpool Street Stations (including Moorgate/London Wall junction) and the routes between these stations and key destinations, including the City Cluster, Culture Mile and Bank
    • Bank Junction and streets between the junction and the City Cluster
    • To support Culture Mile and coincide with the opening of the new Museum for London and proposed Centre for Music:
      - The route from the Millennium Bridge to Culture Mile, including changes to St Paul’s Gyratory
      - The route between the Barbican and the new Museum for London, including Beech Street and Long Lane
    • Fleet Street, including potential further changes to Ludgate Circus (in partnership with TfL)
    • The Bishopsgate corridor, including Monument junction (in partnership with TfL)
    • The Globe View section of the Riverside Walkway
    Proposed Walking Improvements 2019-2030

    Pedestrian priority streets

    New pedestrian priority streets will be introduced across the Square Mile. The initial focus for introducing pedestrian priority streets will be within the City Cluster and Culture Mile. We will also identify opportunities to introduce pedestrian priority on streets with a pavement width of less than two metres.

    An indicative map of these streets is shown below. We will use traffic orders, temporary measures to change the look and feel of streets and signage to accelerate delivery of pedestrian priority streets in advance of permanent changes.

    Pedestrian priority streets will be access only for motor vehicles, with all vehicles, including cycles, expected to give way to people walking. In some instances, streets will be fully pedestrianised or not allow motor vehicle access at certain times. The use of pedestrianised streets by cycles will be decided on a case-by-case basis to ensure people walking and cycling feel safe and comfortable. Pedestrian priority will be supported by design measures to encourage slow and courteous driving and riding.

    Potential Locations for Pedestrian Priority

    Pedestrian crossings

    We will work with Transport for London to make it easier for people walking to cross streets by reviewing all signalised pedestrian crossings with the aim of:

    • Reducing the amount of time people wait for a green man, initially to a maximum of 60 seconds, followed by further reductions in waiting time over the life of this Strategy
    • Giving people more time to cross by using a walking speed of 0.8 metres per second to determine crossing times (currently 1.2 metres per second)
    • Installing sensors (Pedestrian SCOOT) to allow the amount of green man time to be automatically adjusted according to the number of people crossing
    • Reducing overcrowding by widening crossings to provide a minimum pedestrian comfort level of B+
    • Introducing formal diagonal crossings at all crossroads, ensuring pedestrian crossings are on desire lines and removing multi-stage crossings
    • Installing raised tables to improve accessibility and ease crossing
    • Introducing ‘Green man authority’ at appropriate locations – providing a default green man for people walking rather than a default green light for motor traffic

    Continuous footways and courtesy crossings

    We will give people walking greater priority and make streets easier to cross by:

    • Providing courtesy crossings or continuous footways across all side street entrances
    • Installing raised tables at junctions
    • Installing raised tables and pedestrian refuge islands at existing informal crossings
    • Identifying locations for additional crossing points that incorporate raised tables and pedestrian refuge islands

    Campaigns and promotion

    Campaigns and promotional activities will raise awareness among all street users of the priority being given to people walking in the Square Mile. Physical changes to streets will be supported by education, engagement and enforcement to reinforce positive behaviours by drivers and riders towards people walking.

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  3. Proposal 3 Complete the riverside walkway and improve walking connections between the riverside and the rest of the City

    By 2022, we will complete the final section of the walkway along the River Thames at Globe View. We will also:

    • Install a new pedestrian crossing on Upper Thames Street at Puddle Dock to provide direct access to the riverside and Blackfriars Pier
    • Improve the quality of the public realm along the riverfront and identify opportunities to create new open spaces and widen the walkway when riverside sites are redeveloped

    We will complete the Globe View section of the riverside walkway by 2022. We will also work with Transport for London, landowners, developers and other partners to:

    • Improve the connections between the riverside and the rest of the City by making it easier to cross Upper and Lower Thames Street. Improvements will include installing a new pedestrian crossing at the junction with Puddle Dock by 2022, to provide direct access to Blackfriars Pier. We will also work with Transport for London to explore the potential to install additional street-level crossings as an alternative to existing bridges
    • Improve the quality of the public realm along the riverfront and identify opportunities to create new open spaces. Opportunities will be identified and delivered through an updated Riverside Walkway Enhancement Strategy that will be published in 2022
    • Wherever feasible, use the redevelopment of sites along the riverside to widen the walkway
    • Use the planning process to activate the riverfront by introducing more ground floor leisure uses such as restaurants and cafes where they will not adversely affect residents

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  4. Proposal 4 Enhance the Barbican high walks

    We will ensure that the Barbican high walks are well maintained and enhanced where necessary. This will include improving signage and the visibility of access points to make them easier to navigate, particularly along the key north-south link from Wood Street.

    We will maintain existing public lifts that provide access to the high walks and other walking routes. We will explore the potential to add new public and publicly accessible lifts where required through the development process.

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  5. Proposal 5 Ensure new developments contribute to improving the experience of walking and spending time on the City’s streets

    Through the planning process we will work with developers and future occupiers to ensure all new developments provide world-class public realm and adequate space for people walking and contribute to improvements to surrounding streets and walking routes. Existing walking routes and public access across private land will be maintained and major developments will be expected to create new walking routes through their site.

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  6. Proposal 6 Promote and celebrate walking

    We will encourage residents, workers and visitors to explore the Square Mile on foot by:

    • Completing the roll out of new maps and directional signs (Legible London) across the Square Mile by 2022
    • Improving people’s awareness of traffic free walking routes, such as alleyways and routes through parks and gardens, through promotional activities and dedicated wayfinding
    • Organising led walks, working with businesses and heritage and cultural institutions to promote walking and exploring the potential for an annual City walking festival
    • Supporting London-wide, national and international walking campaigns

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  7. Proposal 7 Provide more public space and deliver world-class public realm

    We will improve the experience of spending time on the City’s streets by identifying opportunities to create new public spaces and increasing the amount of seating on streets and in squares, public spaces and parks. We will also:

    • Implement a high standard of design when delivering improvements to streets and public spaces and ensuring streets and public spaces are clean and well maintained
    • Activate the public realm and make the experience of walking and spending time on streets and public spaces more interesting and engaging
    • Improve the public realm in areas where there are buildings and structures of significant historical and architectural importance

    We will improve the experience of spending time on the City’s streets by:

    • Identifying opportunities to create new public spaces by reallocating carriageway
    • Increasing the amount of formal and informal seating on-street and in squares, public spaces and parks. The amount and location of additional on-street seating will be carefully considered to maximise opportunities for social interaction while maintaining adequate width and comfort for people walking. Where necessary space will be reallocated from the carriageway
    • Implementing a high standard of design when delivering improvements to streets and public spaces and ensuring streets and public spaces are clean and well maintained
    • Working with partners to activate the public realm and make the experience of walking and spending time on streets and public spaces more interesting and engaging
    • Improving the public realm in areas where there are buildings and structures of significant historical and architectural importance. Improvements will enhance the setting of significant buildings and other heritage assets and improve accessibility to historic attractions

    The City of London Public Realm Supplementary Planning Document (SPD) provides detailed guidance on designing, delivering and managing world-class public realm in the Square Mile. The Public Realm SPD will be reviewed and updated by 2022 following the adoption of the City Plan 2036.

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  8. Proposal 8 Incorporate more greenery into the City’s streets and public spaces

    We will work with occupiers, businesses, residents and other partners to provide and maintain more permanent and seasonal greenery on the City’s streets. This will include incorporating greenery and planting when making changes to streets and the public realm, including measures that deliver pedestrian priority, traffic calming and vehicle access restrictions. Where possible new planting will incorporate sustainable drainage. Plants will be chosen to maximise biodiversity and create a more interesting and engaging streetscape.

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  9. Proposal 9 Reduce rainwater run-off on City streets and public realm

    Opportunities to incorporate sustainable drainage systems will be reviewed for all transport and public realm schemes, with projects designed to minimise the volume and discharge rate of rainwater run-off. The inclusion of soft landscaping, planters, green walls and trees in all schemes where space permits will also contribute to reducing run-off rates.

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  10. Proposal 10 Incorporate protection from adverse weather in the design of streets and the public realm

    Where possible, transport and public realm projects will incorporate features that provide people walking, cycling and spending time on streets with protection from rain, wind and high temperatures. For example, shade and shelter provided by trees, building canopies and awnings and other street furniture, such as bus stop shelters. Designs will be carefully considered to ensure features to provide shade and shelter help make streets and public space more attractive and engaging.

    The potential impact on street users of sun exposure and any increase in wind speeds and tunnel effects from new developments (particularly tall buildings) will be assessed and mitigated through the planning process.

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  11. Proposal 11 Take a proactive approach to reducing motor traffic

    Key proposal

    We will proactively seek to reduce motor traffic to support the delivery of this Strategy, with the aim of achieving a 25% reduction by 2030. Measures to achieve this include:

    • Encouraging the Mayor of London and TfL to accelerate the development of the next generation of road user charging for London
    • Supporting TfL's efforts to reduce the number of Private Hire Vehicles (minicabs) operating in central London
    • Working with the taxi industry to reduce empty running of taxis
    • Not providing any additional on-street car and motorcycle parking and identifying opportunities to use parking reductions and restrictions to discourage private vehicle use

    Delivering this Strategy will result in a reallocation of street space from motor vehicles to provide more space for people walking, cycling and spending time on the City’s streets. To avoid unreasonably impacting the movement of essential motor traffic it will be necessary to reduce the overall volume of motor vehicles. Reducing motor traffic is also key to improving air quality and delivering Vision Zero.

    We will proactively seek to reduce motor traffic to support the delivery of this Strategy, with the aim of achieving a 25% reduction by 2030. Reductions in all types of motor traffic will be required to achieve this, with the most significant reductions being in the number of private cars and private hire vehicles using the City’s streets.

    To achieve this, we will champion and support the development of the next generation of road user charging for London and encourage the Mayor of London and TfL to accelerate the development of new charging mechanisms.

    This new approach to charging should be implemented within the next Mayoral term. All income should be reinvested in the delivery of Healthy Streets, with a proportion of income generated ring fenced to provide funding for City of London and borough projects.

    While the new charging mechanism is being developed, we will encourage TfL to undertake a further review of the existing Congestion Charge. This review should be wide-ranging and consider charging levels, boundaries, timings and exemptions.

    If a clear commitment to road user charging is not set out in the next Mayor’s election manifesto, we will explore the feasibility of developing an appropriate charging mechanism for the Square Mile, working with London Councils and London’s boroughs to ensure a coordinated approach.

    Additional measures and initiatives to reduce motor traffic in the Square Mile will include:

    • Supporting TfL's efforts to reduce the number of private hire vehicles operating in central London. We will also work with TfL and large operators to reduce circulation and empty running and promote ridesharing
    • Working with the taxi industry to reduce empty running of taxis within the Square Mile, including a City-wide review of taxi ranks and promotion of ride hailing apps
    • Delivering Proposals 38 and 39 to reduce the number of delivery and servicing vehicles in the Square Mile, particularly at peak travel times
    • Working with TfL to identify opportunities to reduce the number of buses travelling through the City without compromising public transport accessibility (Proposal 49)
    • Not providing any additional on-street car and motorcycle parking, identifying opportunities to use parking reductions and restrictions to discourage private vehicle use and continuing to require all new developments to be car-free
    • Working with businesses to reduce the use of private cars, private hire vehicles and taxis for commuting and for trips within the Square Mile and central London
    • Introducing access restrictions and other measures to reduce through traffic in line with the City of London Street Hierarchy (Proposal 12)

    In addition to reducing traffic by 25% by 2030 we will aim for a reduction in motor traffic volumes of at least 50% by 2044.

    We will publish more details about our traffic reduction plans following the next Mayoral election and clarification of how the next Mayor will approach road user charging. This will include how we will work with TfL to develop coordinated measures across central London.

    Achieving this level of traffic reduction is likely to require new shared mobility services and other transport technology innovations, which the City Corporation will support and champion through our Future Transport Programme (Proposal 43).

    Road User Charging

    London was a global leader in road user charging when the Congestion Charge was introduced to central London in 2003. There was an immediate reduction in congestion of 30% and 15% less circulating traffic.

    The Congestion Charge is now 15 years old and has only been subject to minor alterations since it was introduced. In this time, the challenges facing central London have changed considerably. A thriving weekend and night time economy now means that evening and weekend traffic levels (when the Congestion Charge is not in operation) are now similar to those on weekdays. In addition, the proportion of vehicles in the zone that are subject to the charge continues to reduce; particularly because of increasing numbers of licensed private hire vehicles, which are currently exempt from the charge.

    An updated road user charge, that could be varied according to patterns of demand, vehicle type or by distance travelled, would be more effective in reducing traffic levels and congestion in central London. A central London or London-wide approach, compared to a City specific charge, would be the most beneficial model. This will help reduce traffic over a much wider area and avoid a ‘patchwork’ approach to traffic management by different authorities.

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  12. Proposal 12 Design and manage the street network in accordance with the City of London Street Hierarchy

    The City of London Street Hierarchy (see full proposal for a map) describes the function of every street in terms of motor traffic movement. We will design and manage the street network in accordance with the Hierarchy to encourage drivers to use the right street for the right journey.

    • London Access streets are preferred streets for motor vehicles that do not have a destination in the Square Mile
    • City Access streets are preferred streets for motor vehicles that are travelling around the Square Mile
    • Local Access streets are primarily used for the first or final part of a journey, providing access for vehicles to properties but reducing through traffic to support prioritising people walking

    The City of London Street Hierarchy describes the function of every street in terms of motor traffic movement. We will design and manage the street network in accordance with the hierarchy to encourage drivers to use the right street for the right journey. The categories in the hierarchy are:

    • London Access streets: Preferred streets for motor vehicles that do not have a destination in, or immediately adjacent to, the Square Mile
    • City Access streets: Preferred streets for motor vehicles that are travelling around the Square Mile or to immediately adjacent destinations
    • Local Access streets: Primarily used for the first or final part of a journey, providing access for vehicles to properties
    Proposed City of London Street Hierarchy

    A street’s position in the hierarchy will be one factor that helps inform decisions on how space is allocated between different users and uses of that street. Alongside the street hierarchy we will also consider:

    • The views and aspirations of different street users and City residents, workers and businesses
    • How to best prioritise walking, cycling and buses as the most efficient ways to move people
    • How to incorporate the street’s role as a public space and reflect the types of buildings and uses along it, including planned development
    • How to provide appropriate access for delivery, servicing, and other commercial activities
    • How to provide access for residents, people of all abilities and people with access requirements, such as heavy luggage or injuries and illness
    • How to maintain emergency response times and access for emergency services

    Traffic management measures to implement the street hierarchy will be identified through the development of area based Healthy Streets Plans. These will consider:

    • How to reduce the use of Local Access streets by through traffic, while maintaining access
    • Opportunities to introduce pedestrian priority, improve the experience of walking and cycling, enhance the public realm and create new public space
    • Potential changes to kerbside uses including loading and parking
    • Opportunities for area-based approaches to the management of freight and servicing, including consolidation and retiming of deliveries
    • The need for network changes to support planned and future development

    The first three plans, to be developed by 2022, will cover the following areas:

    • Barbican and Smithfield: supporting the delivery of the Culture Mile Look and Feel Strategy and the new Museum for London. The area covered will align with City Plan 2036 Barbican and Smithfield key area of change
    • Bank and Guildhall: incorporating the transformation of Bank Junction and supporting the delivery of the proposed Centre for Music and associated changes to the Museum of London roundabout and St Paul’s Gyratory
    • City Cluster and Fenchurch Street: responding to the growth of the City Cluster and the proposed upgrade of Fenchurch Street station and enabling the delivery of the City Cluster Area Strategy. This will align with the City Plan 2036 City Cluster key area of change and incorporate part of the Aldgate and Tower key area of change

    Healthy Street Plans will be developed in consultation with residents, businesses and other partners and stakeholders. Initial delivery will focus on implementing functional network changes, small scale projects and temporary interventions to change the look and feel of streets and provide additional public space. This will be followed by full implementation, including major transformational projects, that will be programmed to correspond with major developments in the area.

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  13. Proposal 13 Use timed and temporary street closures to help make streets safer and more attractive places to walk, cycle and spend time

    Where necessary and appropriate, we will introduce timed restrictions to motor vehicle access to help implement priority for pedestrians, make walking and cycling safer and improve the experience of spending time on the City’s streets. We will also:

    • Launch a Lunchtime Streets programme in 2019 to provide additional space for people using streets at lunchtime during the summer months, with at least five in operation by 2025
    • Support the leisure and cultural offer of the City by holding ’car-free’ weekends and days
    • Support closures by third parties and residents, particularly those that help promote walking and cycling

    Where necessary and appropriate, we will introduce timed restrictions to motor vehicle access to support the implementation of pedestrian priority streets. This will make walking and cycling safer, more accessible; and improve the experience of spending time on the City’s streets. The potential for timed closures to general motor traffic to improve bus journey times will also be explored. The extent of timed restrictions and types of vehicles excluded will be decided on a case-by-case basis, applying the approach outlined in Proposal 12, and subject to modelling, impact assessments and consultation prior to implementation.

    We will also seek to improve the experience of walking and spending time on the City’s streets by:

    • Launching a Lunchtime Streets programme in 2019 to provide additional space for people using streets at lunchtime during the summer months. At least five Lunchtime Streets will be in operation by 2025
    • Supporting the leisure and cultural offer of the City by holding ’car-free’ weekends and days, with streets only open to people walking and cycling. We will aim to hold the first car-free day in 2019
    • Supporting and facilitating closures by third parties and residents, particularly those that help promote walking and cycling and allow residents, workers and visitors to enjoy the City’s leisure, cultural and historical offer
    • Exploring the potential to make better use of street closures already required to facilitate existing events, such as the Lord Mayor’s Show and City Run. For example, by extending the time closures are in place or increasing the number of streets that are closed to traffic
    Proposed Healthy Streets Plan areas

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  14. Proposal 14 Make the best and most efficient use of the kerbside and car parks

    Key proposal

    We will review the use and management of the on-street parking and loading and City Corporation car parks at least every five years, with the first review completed and consulted on by 2022.

    This review will consider:

    • opportunities to reallocate space from on-street car and motorcycle parking to increase the space available for people walking, cycling and public space
    • provision of short stay commercial parking, disabled bays, taxi ranks, loading bays and coach bays
    • alternative uses for spare capacity in our car parks
    • changes to the current operation of parking and loading, including introducing variable charging for motorcycles based on engine size and emissions, and restricting the use of on-street car parking bays for commercial vehicles only during the working day

    We will keep the use and management of the kerbside and City Corporation car parks under frequent review to:

    • Identify opportunities to reallocate space from on-street car and motorcycle parking to increase the space available for people walking, support the delivery of cycle infrastructure and provide additional public space and cycle parking
    • Ensure adequate on-street provision of short stay commercial parking, disabled bays, taxi ranks, loading bays and coach bays
    • Identify spare capacity in City Corporation car parks and explore alternative uses for this space
    • Identify opportunities to reduce obstructions caused by vehicles loading or waiting to pick up passengers, particularly on bus and cycle routes and at peak travel times

    We will complete and consult on the outcomes of the first City-wide kerbside review by 2022. In addition to the items outlined above, this review will consider the potential to:

    • Extend the charging period for on-street parking bays to include evenings and weekends for non-commercial vehicles
    • Introduce variable charging for motorcycle parking based on motorcycle size and emissions
    • Encourage the use of car parks for long stay parking by reducing the maximum parking time for cars and vans on-street and introducing a maximum on-street parking time for motorcycles
    • Extend the Controlled Parking Zone hours to evenings and weekends
    • Designate on-street car parking as ‘service bays’ during the working day (7am-7pm), with parking restricted for use by commercial vehicles
    • Reduce the maximum loading period from the current 40 minutes when the City’s Controlled Parking Zone restrictions apply
    • Introduce more dedicated loading bays and use technology to allow real-time management of loading activity
    • Implement multi-use spaces, for example loading bay during off-peak hours, additional pavement space during the morning, lunchtime and evening peaks and a taxi rank during the evening

    Further reviews will be conducted at least every five years.

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  15. Proposal 15 Support and champion the ‘Turning the Corner’ campaign

    We will support efforts to secure changes to the Highway Code and national legislation to give people walking and cycling priority at all types of junctions over traffic turning across their path. This arrangement enables simpler junction designs and reduces waiting times at signal-controlled junctions for all users, including drivers. By reducing conflicts between left turning vehicles and people walking and cycling, these changes will support proposals to prioritise people walking and deliver Vision Zero.

    ‘Turning the Corner’ is a campaign led by British Cycling, encouraging the Government to update the Highway Code and national legislation to change the way priority is given at junctions to people walking and cycling. These changes would bring benefits to all street users by improving safety for people walking and cycling and allowing junction layouts to be simpler and clearer and more efficient for all users.

    At a signal-controlled crossing, the changes would mean people walking, people cycling and motor traffic going in the same direction would all receive a green signal at the same time. Vehicles turning across those walking and cycling would have to give way. Most other countries, including the rest of Europe, operate their signal-controlled crossings in this manner.

    At a T-junction, vehicles entering and exiting the minor road would have to give way to both people walking across the minor road and people cycling going straight ahead on the major road. This arrangement is used across much of Europe.

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  16. Proposal 16 Develop and apply the City of London Street Accessibility Standard

    We will develop a City of London Street Accessibility Standard (COLSAS) to set minimum and desired standards for streets to ensure everyone can travel comfortably and confidently. We will:

    • Develop COLSAS through engagement with City residents, workers, access groups and other interested parties
    • Audit City streets against the new standard and produce a Streets Accessibility Action Plan by 2022
    • Streets which do not meet the standard will be prioritised and all critical improvements delivered by 2025

    We will work with City residents, workers, the City of London Access Group (COLAG), our internal access team and groups representing the needs of different street users to develop the City of London Street Accessibility Standard (COLSAS). COLSAS will set minimum and desired standards for the design of streets to ensure they provide an environment where all current and potential users feel welcome and safe and can travel comfortably and confidently.

    The standard will be applicable to all City Corporation managed streets and we will work with TfL to apply the standard to the Transport for London Road Network. We will apply COLSAS by carrying out a detailed access audit of all City streets to assess the current level of accessibility. Details of necessary improvements, including a delivery timetable, will be set out in a Streets Accessibility Action Plan. COLSAS and the Streets Accessibility Action Plan will be published by 2022. Improvements to streets that do not meet the minimum COLSAS standard will be prioritised, with all critical improvements delivered by 2025.

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  17. Proposal 17 Keep pavements free of obstructions

    Key proposal

    We will ensure that pavements and streets are free of obstructions by:

    • Not permitting A-boards on public land and encouraging owners and occupiers to not place A-boards on private land adjacent
    • Only allowing outdoor seating where enough pavement space is maintained at the busiest times of day and working with owners and landlords to stop people drinking outside pubs blocking pavements and streets
    • Ensuring that operators of dockless cycle hire schemes require users to leave bikes in designated parking locations within the Square Mile

    We will ensure that pavements and streets* are free of obstructions by:

    • Not permitting A-boards on the pavement and encouraging owners and occupiers to not place A-boards on private land adjacent to the pavement
    • Only allowing outdoor seating where businesses can demonstrate that adequate width (including private space) will be maintained during the busiest time of day
    • Working with owners and landlords and using highways powers and the licensing system to prevent pavements and streets being blocked by people standing outside bars and pubs, including prohibition of furniture that encourages this
    • Ensuring operators of dockless cycle hire schemes require users to leave bikes in designated parking locations and promptly remove any cycles not left in these locations (see Proposal 28)
    • Continuing to reduce clutter by removing unnecessary street furniture and ensuring remaining furniture is positioned to maintain a clear walking route, including identifying opportunities to affix street lights and signs to buildings
    • Seeking to maintain a pedestrian comfort level of B+ when installing new street furniture, signage, trees and greenery, bollards and security features (see Proposal 2)
    • Ensuring that temporary signage does not significantly reduce pavement width and work with contractors, utilities and developers to ensure signs are placed in carriageway when they will not pose risk to other road users
    • Review the role of pavement obstructions in incidences of trips, falls and claims against the City Corporation

    * Pavements and streets is used in lieu of the legal definition of public highway which includes all publicly adopted carriageway, pavements and City walkways. The Highways Act 1980 requires highways authorities to maintain free, unobstructed access along the highway (Section 130) and allows the City Corporation to restrict any furniture on its highway though section 115(E)(1)(b)(i) of the Act.

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  18. Proposal 18 Keep pedestrian crossings clear of vehicles

    We will work with TfL and London Councils to encourage the Government to change the Highway Code and introduce new legislation to prevent queuing vehicles blocking pedestrian crossings. Any new offences should be decriminalised to allow civil enforcement through issuing a penalty charge notice.

    While awaiting legislative change, we will encourage drivers to leave crossings clear through targeted campaigns and trialling changes to crossing design, such as coloured markings or box junction style hatching.

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  19. Proposal 19 Support and champion accessibility improvement to Underground stations

    We will work with TfL to prioritise investment in accessibility improvements to Underground and DLR stations within the Square Mile, beginning with making Bank Station accessible. Through the planning process we will identify opportunities to introduce step free access as part of new developments and major refurbishments. We will also work with Network Rail to introduce step free access at Moorgate national rail platforms. Our ambition is that all stations within the Square Mile are accessible by 2044. We will liaise with TfL to identify the programme of investment required to achieve this and include further details in the final version of this Strategy.

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  20. Proposal 20 Apply the safe system approach and the principles of road danger reduction to deliver Vision Zero

    Key proposal

    We will deliver Vision Zero to reduce the number of people killed and injured on the City’s streets. Our aim is to eliminate death and serious injuries by 2040. Measures to deliver Vision Zero and reduce road danger will be delivered across for themes:

    • Safer streets, we will redesign our streets to reduce the likelihood and severity of collisions
    • Safer speeds, encouraging people driving and riding through the City to travel at appropriate speeds, including adopting and enforcing a 15mph speed limit by 2022
    • Safer vehicles, including working with partners to increase the scope of the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS) to include vans and ensure that construction projects are CityMark approved and use FORS accredited operators
    • Safer behaviours, encouraging all the users of our streets to travel safely through targeted engagement, education and enforcement

    We will deliver Vision Zero to eliminate death and serious injuries on the City’s streets by 2040. Our interim targets are that no more than 35 people a year are killed or seriously injured by 2022 and that there are fewer than 16 deaths or serious injuries a year by 2030

    Measures to deliver Vision Zero and reduce road danger will be delivered across four themes:

    • Safer streets
    • Safer speeds
    • Safer vehicles
    • Safer behaviours

    We will work in partnership with the City of London Police, TfL and organisations representing different street users to apply the safe system approach and the principles of road danger reduction. This means:

    • Being proportional in our efforts to tackle the sources of road danger, focussing on those users of our streets who have the greatest potential to harm others due to the size and speed of their vehicle
    • Recognising that people will always make mistakes and that collisions can never be entirely eliminated. Our streets must therefore be designed, managed and used to cater for an element of human error and unpredictability
    • Reducing vehicle speeds on our streets to minimise the energy involved in collisions and protect people from death or injury
    • Seeking to reduce slight injuries and fear of road danger alongside the principal focus on eliminating death and serious injuries

    We will publish a comprehensive Road Danger Reduction Action Plan every five years. The 2018 – 2023 plan will be updated in 2019 immediately following the adoption of this Strategy.

    Safer streets

    We will redesign our streets to reduce the likelihood and severity of collisions. Locations for change will be identified and prioritised based on the risk to people walking, cycling and riding powered two wheelers, and the number and severity of collisions. Locations will be reviewed on an annual basis.

    Priority locations for change by 2030, using analysis of data from 2012 to 2017 data, are:

    • Moorgate (London Wall to Eldon Street)
    • High Holborn (Holborn Circus to Warwick Lane)
    • Cannon Street (Mansion House Station to New Change)
    • St Paul’s Gyratory
    • Aldersgate Street/Beech Street
    • Fleet Street/New Fetter Lane Junction
    • Lombard Street – Fenchurch Street Corridor
    • Old Broad Street/London Wall
    • Camomile Street/St Mary’s Axe

    In addition, we will work with TfL to deliver changes at the following priority locations on the TLRN:

    • Bishopsgate
    • Monument Junction
    • Embankment (Temple Avenue to Puddle Dock)
    • Mansell Street
    • Southwark Bridge/Lower Thames Street
    • Upper Thames Street (London Bridge to Eastcheap)

    In addition to the above we will work with TfL to monitor and if necessary further improve Farringdon Street and New Bridge Street (including Ludgate Circus and Blackfriars junction).

    Proposed priority locations for safer streets

    Other measures to change streets to reduce the likelihood and severity of collisions will include:

    • Narrowing and raising the entrances to side streets to require drivers and riders to manoeuvre more slowly
    • Exploring the potential for changing the look and feel of streets to reinforce positive behaviours by people driving and riding in the Square Mile, including appropriate speed, acceleration and overtaking. Innovative techniques that use road markings and temporary or light touch changes to give behavioural cues will be trialled and assessed in up to five locations by 2022
    • Continuing to maintain a smooth and level surface on pavements and carriageways to reduce the risk of trips and falls by people walking and riding in the City

    Safer speeds

    Reducing the speed of vehicles decreases the likelihood of a collision and the severity of injury in the event of one.

    To ensure that all vehicles, including cycles, are driven or ridden at speeds appropriate to the City context we will seek permission from the Department for Transport to adopt a City-wide 15mph speed limit by 2022. If successful, we will encourage TfL to seek permission to deliver this new limit on the TLRN, particularly along the Bishopsgate corridor.

    Why 15mph?

    To make it easier for drivers to comply with the existing 20mph and proposed 15mph speed limits we will encourage the uptake of intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) in the Square Mile by:

    • Asking TfL to prioritise the roll out of bus ISA on routes which operate in the Square Mile, with the aim of bus ISA operating on all routes by 2022.
    • Adopting ISA in our own fleet procurement practices as part of our renewal programme. Insurance savings will be quantified and shared as best practice guidance for City suppliers and through the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS)
    • Ensuring ISA is a standard requirement for any service procured by the City Corporation with a fleet requirement
    • Promoting the installation of ISA in taxis and private hire vehicles and encouraging TfL to make ISA a requirement for new taxis and private hire licensing.
    • Encouraging the uptake of ISA in other fleets, such as hauliers, construction firms and coach operators
    • Working with the insurance industry and vehicle manufacturers to promote and encourage the use of ISA in private vehicles

    Intelligent Speed Adaptation

    Intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) is an in-vehicle system which uses GPS and a database of speed restrictions to limit vehicle speeds. Studies have shown that ISA delivers a substantial decrease in average speed and speed variances and eliminates speed limit violations. It is estimated that non-voluntary ISA could halve the number of fatal collisions in the UK.

    Safer vehicles

    We will improve the safety of motor vehicles which use City’s streets by:

    • Using the Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS) to integrate safety into fleets by:
      • Continuing the CityMark accreditation programme to ensure vehicles at City construction sites meet FORS standards. We will encourage the inclusion of CityMark in Construction Logistic Plans (CLP).
      • Encouraging TfL and industry stakeholders to develop FORS standards for coaches and vans by 2022.
      • Encouraging the integration direct vision standards as part of FORS. This will also be mandated through CLPs and CityMark for City construction sites once the standards are implemented and normalised.
      • Supporting TfL with developing a motorcycle FORS standard for couriers and delivery riders, which will include improved safety training.
    • Continuing to inspect over 1000 vehicles each year with the City Police Commercial Vehicles Unit. We will identify opportunities to intensify the programme and map enforcement related to development density by 2022.
    • Work with industry, sector associations and motorcycle riders to identify and understand levers for motorcyclists to choose lighter, less powered vehicles when riding to and around the City.
    • Identifying any potential risks associated with the uptake of new technologies, including the increased use of quieter zero emission capable vehicles.

    Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme and CityMark

    The Fleet Operator Recognition Scheme (FORS) is a voluntary accreditation scheme for fleet operators. The scheme aims to raise the level of quality within fleet operations, and to demonstrate which operators are achieving best practice in safety, efficiency, and environmental protection.

    CityMark is a project developed by the City Corporation to improve monitoring of vehicle standard compliance at construction sites in the Square Mile.

    All construction projects in the City are members of the Considerate Contractors Scheme (CCS) and CityMark is an addition to that scheme. This keeps the CCS up to date with the leading related safety initiatives, FORS and the Construction Logistics for Community Safety (CLOCS) standard.

    Safer behaviours

    We will encourage all the users of our streets to travel safely by:

    • Expanding the ‘exchanging places’ training course for professional drivers to include the experience of walking, as well as cycling, in the Square Mile
    • Encouraging TfL to require safety training as part of private hire and taxi licensing. This will include Bikeability Level 3 training
    • Providing and promoting free cycle training for people who live, work and study in the City; working closely with City businesses to offer this training in a convenient and easily accessible way
    • Encouraging TfL to include safety-based performance measures instead of timetable performance measures in bus contracts. We will work with TfL and operators to implement these changes as part of its Bus Safety Standard
    • Working with the City of London Police to deliver targeted enforcement of dangerous and reckless driving and riding, including using plain clothed officers
    • Promoting safe and City appropriate driving, cycling and motorcycling through targeted behaviour change campaigns and engagement and enforcement
    • Work with the freight industry and research partners to understand the impact of delivery schedules on driving style and speeds

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  21. Proposal 21 Work with the City of London Police to reduce crime and fear of crime

    We will work with the City of London Police to ensure the design and management of streets helps everyone feel safe and reduces opportunities for crime at all times of the day. We will:

    • Trial use of motorcycle ground anchors at theft hotspots in 2019 and review their usage and effectiveness
    • Run campaigns with cycling and motorcycling groups to promote best practice when locking vehicles
    • Review security provision in City Corporation car parks and other assets as part of the development and delivery of last mile logistics facilities

    We will work with the City of London Police to ensure the design and management of streets helps everyone feel safe and reduces opportunities for crime at all times of the day. Quarterly meetings will review crime trends and methods and identify opportunities to reduce crime through changes to street design and management, enforcement and awareness campaigns.

    Initial measures to reduce vehicle theft and vehicle enabled crime will include:

    • Trialling ground anchors at motorcycle theft hotspots to reduce thefts and help tackle motorcycle enabled crime. We will initiate the trial in 2019 and review the utilisation of anchors and impact on theft rates ahead of proposed roll out
    • Running campaigns with motorcycle and cycle groups to promote best practice locking and security measures
    • Reviewing security provision in City Corporation car parks and other assets as part of the development and delivery of last mile logistics facilities (see Proposal 38)

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  22. Proposal 22 Ensure on-street security measures are proportionate and enhance the experience of spending time on our streets

    Working with the City of London Police, developers and businesses we will deploy appropriate and proportionate security measures to ensure the safety of residents, workers and visitors to the City. Security measures will be:

    • Discreet and installed to avoid reducing the space available to people walking and cycling
    • Multi-functional, incorporating seating, greenery or public art where possible to improve the experience of walking, cycling and spending time on streets.
    • Designed and installed to consider the needs of people with disabilities and access requirements for deliveries and servicing activities at City buildings

    We will work with the City of London Police, developers and City businesses to support the Secure City program by taking a risk-based approach to implementing appropriate and proportionate on-street security measures. We will aim to ensure that security measures are:

    • Discreet and installed to avoid reducing the space available to people walking and cycling
    • Multi-functional, incorporating seating, greenery or public art where possible to improve the experience of walking, cycling and spending time on streets
    • Designed and installed to take account of the access needs of people with disabilities
    • Designed and installed to take account of access requirements for servicing

    We will work with industry partners to develop hostile vehicle mitigation standard benches, planters, fountains and other street furniture. This will include moveable security features to support timed access restrictions for motor vehicles.

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  23. Proposal 23 Improve the quality and functionality of street lighting

    By 2022, the City Corporation will have upgraded its street lighting in accordance with the City of London lighting Strategy. Street lighting will be used to:

    • Improve the ambience of streets and quality of lighting
    • Reduce road danger through appropriate lighting at areas of higher risk, such as junctions
    • Support optimum CCTV operation and other City Police activities

    By 2022 the City Corporation will have upgraded its street lighting in accordance with the City of London Lighting Strategy. The following principles will be embedded across our transportation and public realm schemes as well as developments through the planning process.

    • Use street lighting to improve the look, feel and ambience of streets
    • Improve the quality of lighting for people walking and cycling
    • Reduce road danger through appropriate lighting at areas of higher risk, such as junctions
    • Match lighting provision to the City of London Street Hierarchy and the character of streets
    • Ensure lighting supports CCTV operation
    • Allow flexible lighting control to support City of London Police operations

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  24. Proposal 24 Apply a minimum cycling level of service to all streets

    Key proposal

    To make the City a safe, attractive, and accessible place to cycle we will create a cycle network made up of streets that either have low levels of motor traffic or protected cycle lanes. We will deliver the first parts of this network by 2030 and the full network by 2044 (full details available in the map below). We will also:

    • Review all shared pedestrian/cycle spaces and contraflow cycle lanes, such as Queen Street, and where necessary deliver measures to improve interactions between people walking, cycling and driving
    • Support cycling logistics and the use of cycles as mobility aids by ensuring that all parts of our network are designed to be accessible to non-standard cycles, such as cargo cycles or adapted cycles

    We will make the Square Mile a safe, attractive, and accessible place to cycle by applying a minimum cycling level of service to all streets by 2044.

    On the streets shown in the map below, which will form a core cycling network, we will ensure that either:

    • Motor traffic volumes are kept below 150 vehicles an hour in each direction at the busiest time of day and priority is given to people cycling over motor vehicles. If necessary, we will introduce traffic management measures to reduce the number of vehicles on these streets

    or

    • Protected cycle lanes that are a minimum of 1.5m wide per direction of travel are provided, with 2m wide protected cycle lanes wherever possible

    We recognise that initially it may not be possible to achieve these levels of service at all locations and will identify mitigating measures in the short and medium term to manage this.

    We will prioritise cycling improvements and interventions on the core cycle network. This will ensure that nearly all property entrances are within 250m of the network, providing access to destinations across the Square Mile and linking with the wider London cycle network. We will explore the potential to use temporary measures and interventions to accelerate the pace of delivering the network and allow changes to street layout to be tested and refined before being made permanent. We will support cycle logistics and the use of cycles as mobility aids by ensuring that all parts of this network are designed to be accessible to non-standard cycles, such as cargo cycles or adapted cycles.

    We will deliver the following parts of the core cycle network by 2030:

    • Aldgate to Holborn Circus via Bank including connecting the City Cluster to Cycle Superhighway 2 (CS2) and CS6
    • CS3 to St Paul’s via the City Cluster and London Wall (in conjunction with planned network improvements at St Paul's Gyratory)
    • CS1 to CS4 via Bank (including working with TfL to make improvements to Monument Junction)
    • Bank to Blackfriars (including improvements at Mansion House junction)
    • CS2 to CS3 via Mansell Street (in partnership with TfL)
    Proposed core cycling network and phasing

    On Local Access streets that do not form part of the core cycling network, we will aim to keep motor traffic volumes below 150 vehicles an hour in each direction at the busiest time of day to give priority to people cycling over motor vehicles. For the majority of Local Access streets this will require relatively little intervention, other than junction improvements. Traffic levels are already low, and this Strategy will deliver reductions in traffic volumes (Proposal 11) and introduce a City-wide 15mph speed limit (Proposal 20). In cases where traffic volumes exceed this limit we will seek to reduce traffic volumes through changes to access and traffic management.

    On City Access streets, we will aim to meet the standards described above but recognise this may not be possible on all streets due to their role in traffic movement or space constraints. Other proposals in this Strategy, such as the introduction of a City-wide 15mph speed limit, will help make these streets safer, more attractive, and more accessible places to cycle.

    To support the new cycling levels of service we will also:

    • Review all shared pedestrian/cycle spaces, such as Queen Street, and contraflow cycle lanes, and where necessary propose physical changes, campaigns, education, engagement and enforcement to improve interactions between people walking, cycling and driving
    • Use signage and road markings to emphasise priority for people cycling over motor vehicles
    • Introduce safety improvements at the priority locations identified in Proposal 20 to ensure they are safe and easy places to cycle
    • Trial temporary schemes and infrastructure wherever possible to review impacts on other street users and accelerate the delivery of the cycle network

    Additional measures to support the delivery of the core cycle network will include:

    • The use of Construction Logistics Plans and Delivery and Servicing Plans to manage the number of freight vehicles using the network, particularly at peak times
    • Enhanced cycle wayfinding and signage
    • Working with boroughs neighbouring the City and TfL to improve continuity and connectivity between our cycle networks

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  25. Proposal 25 Increase the amount of cycle parking in the City

    We will conduct a City-wide cycle parking review and publish a Cycle Parking Delivery Plan by 2022. This will include:

    • Reviewing the availability and distribution of both on and off-street public and residential cycle parking provision to ensure adequate provision
    • Assessing requirements for public and residential cycle parking that can accommodate cargo cycles and adapted cycles
    • Promoting the use of City Corporation car parks for long stay cycle parking and exploring the potential for commercially operated cycle parking hubs

    We will conduct a City-wide cycle parking review and publish a Cycle Parking Delivery Plan by 2022. This will:

    • Review the availability and distribution of both on and off-street public and residential cycle parking provision to ensure adequate provision, taking account of forecast demand
    • Assess requirements for public and residential cycle parking that can accommodate cargo cycles and adapted cycles
    • Promote the use of City Corporation car parks for long stay cycle parking
    • Explore the potential for innovative parking solutions that increase the space efficiency of cycle parking
    • Assess the potential for commercially operated cycle parking hubs that provide enhanced security and facilities
    • Assess occupancy levels of cycle parking in recently completed commercial buildings to understand current use and inform future planning policy on workplace cycle parking

    Further reviews will be conducted on a regular basis, and at least every 5-years.

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  26. Proposal 26 Ensure new developments contribute to improving the experience of cycling in the City

    Through the planning process we will work with developers and future occupiers to:

    • Ensure all new developments provide secure cycle parking facilities, that are at least in line with the London Plan’s minimum standards for cycle parking, have step free access and include lockers and showers in commercial developments
    • Encourage the provision of parking facilities that are suitable for non-standard cycles, including providing off-street storage for cargo bikes and hand carts in developments that include ground floor retail and takeaway food outlets
    • Provide on-site short stay cycle parking for visitors and, where possible, additional public cycle parking in the public realm
    • Contribute to improving conditions for cycling on adjacent streets, particularly those that connect to or form part of the core cycling network

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  27. Proposal 27 Promote and celebrate cycling

    Measures to encourage residents, workers and visitors to cycle to and around the Square Mile will include:

    • Connecting businesses and residents to additional cycling support services, such as maintenance and insurance
    • Targeted campaigns and promotional activities to encourage a more diverse range of people to cycle and promote better behaviours when cycling
    • Organising led rides and exploring the potential for an annual City cycling festival

    We will encourage residents, workers and visitors to cycle to and around the Square Mile by:

    • Connecting businesses and residents to additional cycling support services, such as maintenance and insurance
    • Improving people’s awareness of the cycling network and cycle routes to the City through promotional activities and wayfinding
    • Organising led rides, working with businesses and heritage and cultural institutions to promote cycling
    • Exploring the potential for an annual City cycling festival
    • Supporting London-wide, national and international cycling campaigns and hosting periodic cycling events
    • Targeted campaigns and promotional activities to encourage a more diverse range of people to cycle and promote better behaviours when cycling

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  28. Proposal 28 Improve cycle hire in the City

    We will work with TfL and cycle hire providers to improve the quality and accessibility of all cycle hire facilities including docked, dockless, and cargo cycles for residents, workers, and visitors. In doing so, we will ensure that, among other things:

    • Cycles for hire are readily accessible in suitable numbers and in appropriate locations across the City
    • There are adequate parking and docking facilities and that these are managed to respond to peaks in demand
    • Hire cycles and associated infrastructure do not obstruct pavements or pedestrian crossings or pose a danger to street users

    We will work with TfL and cycle hire providers to improve the quality and accessibility of all cycle hire facilities including docked, dockless, and cargo cycles for residents, workers, and visitors. In doing so, we will ensure that:

    • Cycles for hire are readily accessible in suitable numbers and in appropriate locations across the City
    • There are adequate parking and docking facilities and that these are managed to respond to peaks in demand
    • Hire cycles and associated infrastructure do not obstruct pavements or pedestrian crossings or pose a danger to street users
    • Operators cover the costs of any additional infrastructure required to facilitate cycle hire
    • Any redistribution of hire cycles by vans or other motorised modes are done with zero emission capable vehicles
    • Dockless cycle operators actively restrict their users from parking outside designated areas and quickly remove cycles that are parked in these areas
    • Cycle hire parking and docking locations and total spaces provided are reviewed and enhanced as demand changes

    We will work with TfL and London Councils to secure a byelaw that grants local authorities in London regulatory powers to effectively manage current and future cycle hire activities on our streets.

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  29. Proposal 29 Support and champion a central London Zero Emission Zone

    Key proposal

    We will support and champion the introduction of a Zero Emission Zone (ZEZ) covering central London within the next Mayoral term. We will seek a phased introduction of ZEZ restrictions with the aim of ensuring that 90% of motor vehicles entering the Square Mile are zero emission capable by 2030.

    While the Central London ZEZ is being developed we will introduce local ZEZs covering the Barbican and Golden Lane estates and the City Cluster by 2022. Proposals will be developed in consultation with residents and businesses and will reflect the availability of zero emission capable vehicles.

    We will support and champion the introduction of a Zero Emission Zone (ZEZ) covering central London within the next Mayoral term.

    We will seek a phased introduction of ZEZ restrictions with the aim of ensuring that 90% of motor vehicles entering the Square Mile are zero emission capable by 2030. This is likely to be achieved through a combination of access restrictions and charging for non-zero emission capable vehicles.

    If a clear commitment to introduce a central London ZEZ is not set out in the next Mayor’s election manifesto, or commitments are insufficiently ambitious, we will explore the feasibility of implementing a City-wide ZEZ, working with London Councils and boroughs neighbouring the City to ensure a coordinated approach.

    Local Zero Emission Zones

    While the Central London ZEZ is being developed we will introduce local ZEZs covering the Barbican and Golden Lane estates and the City Cluster by 2022. Proposals will be developed in consultation with residents and businesses and will reflect the availability of zero emission capable vehicles, while seeking to accelerate their uptake. We will coordinate proposals with TfL, London Councils and London’s boroughs to ensure alignment with other existing and planned zero emissions areas and streets.

    Proposed Local Zero Emission Zones

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  30. Proposal 30 Install additional electric vehicle charging infrastructure

    We will install additional publicly accessible electric vehicle (EV) rapid charge points by 2025 to support the transition to zero emission capable vehicles, including exploring the potential for a charging hub with priority access for commercial vehicles. Locations will be identified through engagement with the TfL EV Infrastructure Taskforce. The first preference will be to install any charge points in car parks or other suitable off-street locations.

    We will install additional publicly accessible electric vehicle (EV) rapid charge points by 2025 to support the transition to zero emission capable vehicles, including exploring the potential for a charging hub with priority access for commercial vehicles. We will assess the need for additional charge points for taxis and investigate the charging infrastructure required to encourage a transition to electric motorcycles and mopeds.

    Locations will be identified through engagement with the TfL EV Infrastructure Taskforce. The first preference will be to install any charge points in car parks or other suitable off-street locations. Where it is essential to locate on-street, charge points will be installed in the carriageway rather than on the pavement.

    Through the planning process we will require the installation of rapid charge points in new developments with off-street loading. We will also encourage the owners, managers and occupiers of existing buildings with loading bays to install rapid charge points.

    The provision of charging infrastructure will be kept under review to ensure it is sufficient to meet the needs of residents and vehicles serving the City without generating additional traffic. Reviews will also consider the need to update, and potentially reduce, charging infrastructure as battery technology improves.

    Existing electric vehicle charging provision

    Fast charge points are currently available in all City Corporation public car parks and in the Barbican residents’ car park. We are working in partnership with TfL to deliver a rapid charging hub for taxis in Baynard House car park and a single taxi only rapid charge point on Noble Street.

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  31. Proposal 31 Request an accelerated roll out of zero emission capable buses

    We will urge TfL to prioritise zero emission capable buses on routes through the Square Mile. We will request that all buses serving the City are zero emission capable by 2030, ahead of TfL’s current commitment for all buses to be zero emission or hybrid by 2035.

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  32. Proposal 32 Support small businesses to accelerate the transition to zero emission capable vehicles

    We will work with the Government, TfL and manufacturers to develop incentive schemes and favourable leasing arrangements that support small businesses in acquiring zero emission capable vehicles. We will also consider opportunities, such as preferential pricing for parking/loading for vehicles in this category, to provide time limited incentives to invest in zero emission capable vehicles.

    We will encourage the Government to introduce legislative change to exclude battery weight from vehicle weight limits, to ensure that smaller electric vans and lorries are not subject to more restrictive access and for driver licence requirements

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  33. Proposal 33 Make the City of London’s own vehicle fleet zero emissions

    The City Corporation will upgrade its vehicles which operate in the Square Mile to meet the standards we set for local ZEZs. Contractors vehicles that operate within the Square Mile will also be required to meet these standards. Where possible EV charging infrastructure in City Corporation operational sites will be made available to contractors’ vehicles.

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  34. Proposal 34 Reduce the level of noise from motor vehicles

    The transition to zero emission capable vehicles and general traffic reduction will help to reduce noise from motor traffic. Other measures to reduce noise will include: well-maintained carriageway surfaces and utility access covers; campaigns to reduce engine idling and the inappropriate use of horns; and working with the emergency services to reduce the use and volume of sirens.

    We will work with the City of London Police to undertake targeted noise enforcement of motor vehicles that do not comply with legal requirements to maintain an appropriate/type approved exhaust or are not within legal decibel limits for the vehicle type.

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  35. Proposal 35 Reduce noise from streetworks

    The City Corporation will manage and seek to reduce the noise impacts of streetworks through the Code of Practice: Minimising the Environmental Impact of Streetworks. This requires contractors working for the City Corporation and third parties to use the ‘best practicable means’ to minimise the effects of noise and dust. including:

    • Restricting periods of operation of noisy activities
    • Undertaking liaison with neighbours
    • Using less noisy methods and equipment

    The City Corporation will manage and seek to reduce the noise impacts of streetworks through the Code of Practice: Minimising the Environmental Impact of Streetworks. This requires contractors working for the City Corporation and third parties to use the ‘best practicable means’ to minimise the effects of noise and dust, including:

    • Restricting periods of operation of noisy activities
    • Undertaking liaison with neighbours
    • Using less noisy methods and equipment
    • Reducing transmission and propagation of noise, for example by using noise enclosures or barriers
    • Managing arrangements including contract management, planning of works, training and supervision of employees to ensure measures are implemented

    A review of the Code of Practice will be undertaken by 2020 to ensure it reflects best practice, with further updates as required. The review will also consider how we can better work with TfL, utility companies and contractors to improve the level of adherence to the Code.

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  36. Proposal 36 Encourage innovation in air quality improvements and noise reduction

    We will work with the Government, TfL, industry and other partners to encourage the development of innovative solutions to reduce transport related noise and emissions. For example, by supporting trials, sponsoring competitions and awards, and hosting conferences and seminars.

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  37. Proposal 37 Ensure street cleansing regimes support the provision of a world-class public realm

    The City’s street cleansing regime will ensure all walking routes, cycle routes and public realm areas are cleaned to a high standard and kept free of litter.

    We will reduce litter from smoking, working with Public Health to support campaigns and initiatives to stop smoking and, if necessary, prosecuting offenders.

    We will continue to work with businesses to minimise the impact of waste collection on the public realm, including through time banded collections that restrict the times when rubbish and recycling can be left on the street.

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  38. Proposal 38 Reduce the number of freight vehicles in the Square Mile

    Key proposal

    We will work with businesses, suppliers, the freight industry and other stakeholders to reduce the number of motorised freight vehicles in the Square Mile by 15% by 2030 and by 30% by 2044. Measures to achieve this will include:

    • Exploring the potential for area and City-wide timed access and loading restrictions for motorised freight vehicles. Our aim is to reduce the number of these vehicles on our streets in the peak periods by 50% by 2030 and by 90% by 2044, while ensuring businesses and residents can still receive essential deliveries.
    • Establishing a consolidation service by 2022. Freight consolidation involves routing deliveries to a business, building or area via a warehouse where they are grouped together prior to final delivery.
    • Establish last mile logistics hubs to enable more deliveries within the Square Mile to be made by cargo cycles, on foot and by small electric vehicles; and maximising the potential to use the River Thames for the movement of freight

    We will seek to reduce the number of motorised freight vehicles in the Square Mile by 15% by 2030 and by 30% by 2044 and facilitate the transition to ultra-low emission and zero emission delivery vehicles.

    To achieve this target, we will work with businesses, suppliers, the freight industry and other relevant partners to deliver an integrated freight programme that incorporates retiming, consolidation, last mile logistics, construction logistics, better use of the river and smarter procurement practices.

    Retiming deliveries

    We will explore the potential for area and City-wide timed access and loading restrictions for motorised freight vehicles. Our aim is to reduce the number of these vehicles on our streets in the peak periods by 50% by 2030 and by 90% by 2044, while ensuring businesses and residents can still receive essential deliveries.

    Measures to encourage retiming will include:

    • Permitting night-time deliveries where there will be negligible impact on residents both en route and in the City. Through the planning process we will ensure all appropriate new developments have restrictions to limit deliveries between 7am-10am, 12pm-2pm and 4pm-7pm
    • Engaging with property managers, occupiers and businesses which may wish to retime deliveries and seeking to remove any restrictions in their planning consents where there will be negligible impact on residents
    • Integrating out of peak deliveries as part of the sustainable logistics programme and identify opportunities for retiming freight on an area basis within Healthy Streets Plans (see Proposal 12)
    • Working with London Councils, TfL and neighbouring local authorities to modernise the London Lorry Control Scheme (LLCS) to generate more opportunities for out of peak and night time deliveries.

    Consolidation

    Using established best practice, we will work with a partner haulier to provide a consolidation service for the Square Mile by 2022. A major engagement exercise with City businesses will promote and encourage the use of this consolidation service. This will include developing a consolidation toolkit for City businesses, informed by monitoring of the benefits arising from consolidating deliveries to the Guildhall complex.

    We will also continue to use the planning process to require all new major developments to use a consolidation service to reduce deliveries to their buildings.

    In the longer term we will develop a commercially sustainable approach to consolidation for the Square Mile and establish a sustainable logistics centre to serve the City by 2030. This centre will co-locate major suppliers in a single warehouse, alongside consolidation, waste collection and couriering services.

    What is freight consolidation?

    Freight consolidation involves routing deliveries to a business, building or area via a warehouse where they are grouped together prior to final delivery. This approach means that the final stage of delivery is made by fewer, fuller vehicles, significantly reducing the number of lorries and vans making deliveries.

    Case studies have shown that freight consolidation can reduce the number of delivery trips by 46 – 80%. Enabling freight consolidation is critical to achieving our targets for reducing freight vehicles.

    Examples of this consolidation include the Bristol and Bath Consolidation Centre, the London Borough Consolidation Centre and Regent Street Clipper Consolidation. The City Corporation already mandates the use of consolidation centres in planning consents, including 22 Bishopsgate and 1 Undershaft, to mitigate the impact of new development on City streets

    How freight consolidation works

    Last mile logistic hubs

    We will enable more deliveries within the Square Mile to be made by cargo cycles, on foot and by small electric vehicles by:

    • Delivering two last mile logistic hubs in underutilised City Corporation assets by 2022. A further three hubs will be delivered by 2025.
      Establishing additional last mile logistics hubs if appropriate underutilised assets are identified.
    • Exploring opportunities to acquire new sites within or adjacent to the Square Mile for last mile logistic hubs.
    • Working with developers and land owners to integrate last mile logistic hubs as part of major City developments.

    Increase the use of the River Thames for freight

    We will maximise the potential to use the Thames for the movement of freight by:

    • Maintaining the commercial waste operation at Walbrook Wharf and supporting additional waste carried through the Wharf
    • Identifying opportunities to increase the use of the river for freight deliveries to the Square Mile
    • Working closely with Thames Tideway to identify future opportunities for their wharves and barges once construction is completed. Working with river freight operators to ensure that their fleets meet Port of London Authority air quality standards
    • Exploring the use of Blackfriars and Tower Piers and a reinstated Swan Lane Pier as points to transfer freight for last mile delivery on foot or by cargo cycle.

    Reducing the impact of construction logistics

    To facilitate future development while minimising the impact of construction logistics, we will:

    • Work with TfL to update Construction Logistics Plan guidance by 2022. This updated guidance will include stricter expectations for construction consolidation and on-site waste compaction. It will also review the potential for emerging technology, such as 3D printing or higher payload and carrying potential of new rigid axle vehicles to reduce the number of deliveries.
    • Work with developers and contractors to adapt and develop construction delivery management systems to facilitate retiming of deliveries to outside the 7-10am peak.
    • Through the planning process, all development within the City must consider use of the River Thames for the movement of construction materials and waste.

    Procurement and personal deliveries

    To encourage smarter commercial decision making for our businesses and influence how residents and workers get goods delivered, we will:

    • Share information on the impact of personal deliveries on traffic in the City, including air quality and road danger and promote the use of click and collect services.
    • Establish a collaborative procurement programme for the Square Mile by 2022. This will allow businesses, particularly small and medium sized businesses, to share suppliers and waste services. We will work with Cheapside Business Alliance and the Aldgate Partnership to trial the programme prior to a City-wide roll out.
    • Identify opportunities for other City Corporation initiatives, such as Plastic Free City and our Responsible Business Strategy, to support efforts to reduce the number of deliveries and waste collections

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  39. Proposal 39 Develop a sustainable servicing programme

    We will work with servicing businesses and facility and property managers to develop a Servicing Action Plan, to be published by 2022. This will identify opportunities to reduce the number of vans and other service vehicles in the Square Mile while seeking to improve response times and quality of service. We will also explore the potential to provide secure storage space for tools and materials as part of last mile delivery hubs to reduce the need for engineers to travel to and around the Square Mile by van.

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  40. Proposal 40 Allow some Local Access streets to function as City Access streets during significant disruption

    At times it may be necessary to allow access only streets to be temporarily reopened to through traffic in response to planned and unplanned disruption. Appropriate management arrangements will ensure streets remain safe for all users, such as a clear demarcation of pedestrian space and lower speed limits.

    We will maintain a primary ‘resilience network’ for motor vehicles that can be ‘switched on’ in response to significant planned or unplanned disruption. Local Access streets on the resilience network will be designed to allow temporary reopening to through traffic or occasionally accommodate higher volumes of motor vehicles. This approach will also ensure that emergency services can use these streets when necessary.

    Appropriate management arrangements will ensure streets remain safe for all users, such as a clear demarcation of pedestrian space, lower speed limits and marshalling. We will explore the use of technology for advance messaging both on-street for all users and through in-vehicle navigation systems to communicate and manage changing or temporary arrangements.

    Proposed primary resilience network

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  41. Proposal 41 Reduce the impact of construction and streetworks

    Key proposal

    We will work with utility companies, contractors and developers to minimise the impact of construction and streetworks and prioritise maintaining access for people walking and cycling. Measures to reduce the impact of streetworks will include:

    • Encouraging collaborative working and coordinating street works
    • Reducing the duration of works by allowing extended and night-time working where noise considerations allow
    • Improving communication through better engagement with businesses and residents for longer duration works

    The needs of people walking will be prioritised during streetworks and construction, with the aim of maintaining a comfortable and accessible walking route on both sides of the street, with space reallocated from general traffic as necessary. Accessible diversions must be provided if space constraints do not allow an acceptable level of temporary provision.

    We will work with utility companies, contractors and developers to minimise the impact of construction and streetworks on people walking and cycling. Traffic management plans for construction sites and streetworks will maintain access for different users in accordance with the following hierarchy:

    • Walking
    • Cycling and buses
    • Taxis
    • General traffic

    We have a Network Management Duty which requires us to ensure we apply best practice to managing streetworks. We will review this in 2019 and on a regular basis to ensure our activity and processes remain up to date and effective.

    Within the context of the Network Management Duty, we will encourage the drafting of legislation to allow penalties to be charged against developments that overrun their agreed licence periods for scaffolds and hoardings.

    We will review the City’s Guidance Notes for Activities on the Public Highway in 2019 to ensure that guidance is in line with best practice and the requirements outlined above. A review will include considering the opportunity to introduce lane rental controls on our major streets to further reduce the impact of street works.

    We will seek to minimise disruption caused by streetworks by:

    • Encouraging collaborative working and coordinating street works
    • Exploring the potential for new technology to reduce noise and the extent of works and speed up delivery
    • Reducing the duration of works by allowing extended and night-time working where noise considerations allow
    • Improving signage and permit information, to include contact details, purpose of works and other information such as reason for site inactivity
    • Improving communication through better engagement with businesses and residents for longer duration works
    • Work with TfL to improve communication on the impact of streetworks and other maintenance on public transport services
    • We will work with TfL to explore the potential to further adjust traffic signal timings to reflect actual and modelled traffic flows during periods of network disruption. We will also explore new adaptive traffic control technologies as they emerge through our Future Transport Programme (Proposal 43)

    We will work with the utilities sector to establish a Utilities Taskforce that will identify future infrastructure requirements (based on City Plan 2036 growth forecasts) and a programme of planned investment. This will help improve the coordination of large scale utilities works and minimise associated disruption.

    We will use medium and long-term street closures as an opportunity to open streets to people, for example working with businesses to provide temporary seating or programmed events. We will also monitor the traffic impacts of long-term street works to inform transport and resilience planning and assess the potential for retaining capacity reductions or access restrictions.

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  42. Proposal 42 Make the street network resilient to severe weather events

    We will work with the London Climate Change Partnership Transport Adaptation Sector Group (TASG) to ensure that the street network and transport system remains open during severe weather events.

    Highway management regimes, including the Winter Service Plan, will consider walking, cycling and motor vehicle routes as equally important.

    We will work with the London Climate Change Partnership Transport Adaptation Sector Group (TASG) to ensure the street network and transport system remains open during severe weather events. With TASG, we will undertake risk assessments based on current and predicted impacts of climate change and develop mitigating measures that will be implemented when thresholds are reached, including temperature change or levels of rainfall. This process will ensure the City Corporation and TfL are prepared to respond to extreme weather events that may affect our streets, the TLRN and rail and Underground networks.

    The initial programme for the TASG first stage assessment is set out below. Further detailed assessments and mitigation plans will be informed by the Met Office’s 2018 Climate projections, which will be released in November 2018.

    • Agree indicators and complete transport sector assessments (autumn/winter 2018)
    • Publish assessments (late 2018)
    • Review and update every two years

    Highway management regimes, including the Winter Service Plan (updated annually), will consider walking, cycling and motor vehicle routes as equally important. Priority 1 footpaths and cycle routes will be treated for snow and ice at the same time as priority 1 streets.

    Winter maintenance priority one streets

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  43. Proposal 43 Establish a Future Transport Programme

    Key proposal

    We will establish a Future Transport Programme to work with developers of transport innovations. This programme will engage with industry, academia and other partners to deliver trials and supporting the uptake of appropriate and beneficial transport technologies and other innovations. The programme will apply a test of appropriateness to help identify the most positive and beneficial innovations. This test includes considering how innovations:

    • Support priority for people walking and efforts to enable more people to choose to walk and cycle, and avoid shifting people from sustainable travel modes to unsustainable travel modes
    • Contribute to efforts to reduce motor vehicle volumes and mileage and not increase motor traffic volumes
    • Help make our streets safer and reduce road danger, collision rates, collision severity and terrorism risk

    We will establish a Future Transport Programme to work with developers of mobility innovations. This programme will:

    • Engage with industry, academia, government Catapults and partners to deliver transport innovation and technology trials across the City, including trials on:

    - App-based parking and un/loading permitting and enforcement
    - Technology-assisted kerbside space reallocation
    - On-demand accessible shuttles and shared transport services
    - App-assisted pedestrian crossing technologies for the partially sighted and people who require more time to cross
    - Geofencing and permitting
    - Use of drones to support the emergency services and make urgent deliveries to hospitals
    - Technology to support the delivery of Vision Zero by reducing the likelihood and severity of collisions

    • Identify measures required to support the uptake of appropriate mobility solutions, such as off-street storage of shared autonomous vehicles
    • Host conferences and seminars and support competitions and awards for transport innovations and technologies
    • Explore the potential for commercial opportunities and partnerships within the transport technology and innovation industry

    A more detailed programme of activities will be developed shortly after the publication of the Transport Strategy and in consultation with the Future Transport Advisory Board (Proposal 44).

    We recognise the significant potential for new technologies to improve the City’s streets and will openly enter into discussion with any innovators. Future transport innovations will be considered appropriate for trial and use in the City context if they support the delivery of Healthy Streets and adhere to the following requirements (when applicable):

    1. Support priority for people walking and efforts to enable more people to choose to walk and cycle, and not shift people from sustainable travel modes to unsustainable travel modes
    2. Contribute to efforts to reduce motor vehicle volumes and mileage and not increase motor traffic volumes
    3. Lead to an overall increase in vehicle occupancy and loading
    4. Help make our streets safer and not increase road danger, collision rates, collision severity, terrorism risk, or the need for additional policing or enforcement
    5. Reduce vehicle speeds and ensure vehicles travel at speeds appropriate to conditions and the City context
    6. Minimise obstructions to vehicles and people walking, and not permanently obstruct pavements or add clutter
    7. Improve the efficiency of kerbside use and not increase parking or loading space requirements
    8. Help spread travel demand, for both people and goods, more evenly across the day, such as outside morning, lunchtime and evening peaks and overnight
    9. Help make streets and the City’s air cleaner and quieter by reducing transport related emissions and noise
    10. Improve the experience of using the City’s streets and open spaces and support efforts to increase the amount of public space

    Additional requirements apply to the introduction of connected and autonomous vehicles, drones and droids on our streets.

    • Connected and autonomous vehicles must not require any changes or infrastructure that have a negative impact on our streets, such as bollards or barriers
    • Drones must not operate without CAA and City of London permission
    • Droids must not operate on pavements or in such a way as to obstruct or pose a danger to any user of our streets

    Developers and operators of new transport innovations and services are expected to:

    • Share all beneficial data generated or collected with the City Corporation to aid in policy and decision making
    • Not discriminate against any potential user, either through active discrimination or through profiling or algorithmic/AI discrimination or bias
    • Accommodate every user, especially those requiring wheelchairs or mobility aids when innovations and technologies incorporate motor vehicles
    • Not generate any unreasonable additional costs for the City Corporation or users
    • Ensure any supporting digital software and hardware is sufficiently and rigorously safeguarded from malicious use or intent that could pose a risk to physical or digital safety in the City
    • Readily and proactively engage with the City and regularly inform them of their activities and plans

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  44. Proposal 44 Establish a Future Transport Advisory Board

    To ensure that we can identify and proactively respond to future transport innovations we will engage with industry partners, experts, and academics through a Future Transport Advisory Board. The Future Transport Advisory Board will meet twice a year to:

    • Support and advise on the activities of the Future Transport Programme
    • Advise on emerging transport technology and innovation industry trends, and suitable responses to them
    • Act as a sounding board on the City’s approach to managing upcoming innovations and technological launches
    • Review the City’s future mobility policies, positions, and trials
    • Help facilitate connections and relationships between City officials and the wider transport technology industry

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  45. Proposal 45 Explore the need for legislative change to ensure emerging technology and innovation benefits the Square Mile

    We will support and engage with all levels of government, industry and sector representatives to develop frameworks and legislation for future transport and ensure overall positive outcomes for the Square Mile, London and other cities. Initially we will seek local and national legislative action on:

    • Licensing for the semi and fully-autonomous vehicle market, alongside the development of safety, design, digital security, and supporting infrastructure regulations
    • Strengthening existing Civil Aviation Authority regulations on small remotely-piloted aircraft and drones
    • Clarifying the operating parameters of droids and other small autonomous vehicles
    • Regulating the dockless cycle hire industry, as outlined in Proposal 28

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  46. Proposal 46 Support and champion better national and international connections to the Square Mile

    We will work with the Mayor of London, TfL, the Government, airport and rail operators and other related partners to improve national and international connectivity to the City, including through supporting:

    • Increased airport capacity in the South East, recognising that this will most efficiently be delivered through a third runway at Heathrow to be delivered as soon as possible.
    • Improved connectivity to London’s airports through increased capacity and additional frequency on the West Anglia Main Line to Stansted Airport, a new Crossrail station at City Airport, constructed at the same time as the delivery of the Ebbsfleet extension and Increased DLR frequency to City Airport
    • The delivery of High Speed 2 as quickly as reasonably possible
    • Improved national rail access to London, including electrification, station expansions and general service improvements

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  47. Proposal 47 Support and champion improved connections to the Square Mile from Greater London and the surrounding region

    We will work with the Mayor of London, TfL, Government, boroughs neighbouring the City and other related partners to improve regional connections to the Square Mile, including through supporting:

    • Devolution of suburban rail service franchising to TfL, with a view to providing a London Suburban Metro service by 2030
    • Extending the Overground to Barking Riverside
    • The delivery of Crossrail 2 as soon as reasonably possible
    • Enhancing the coverage and frequency of 24-hour public transport services in central London, taking account of the need to minimise noise and other impacts on residents.

    We will work with the Mayor of London, TfL, Government, boroughs neighbouring the City and other related partners to improve regional connectivity to the Square Mile, including through supporting:

    • Devolution of suburban rail service franchising to TfL, with a view to providing a London Suburban Metro service by 2030
    • Accessibility improvements to rail and Underground stations in the Square Mile, as outlined in Proposal 19
    • Extending the Overground to Barking Riverside
    • The delivery of Crossrail 2 as soon as reasonably possible
    • Enhancing the coverage and frequency of 24-hour public transport services in central London, including increasing the number of lines operating night-tube services, enhancing the 24-hour bus network, and improving night-time DLR and rail operations, including Crossrail. Any extensions to operating hours must take account of the need to minimise noise and other impacts on residents
    • Improvements to Liverpool Street Rail and Bus Station, including enhancing step free access and improving entry points
    • Exploring the feasibility of Sunday operation of the Waterloo and City Line
    • Immediate improvements to street-level interchange between Fenchurch Street and Tower Hill, Tower Gateway and Aldgate stations, including wayfinding. Exploration of the feasibility of a direct interchange route between Fenchurch Street and Tower Gateway and Tower Hill
    • Access and capacity improvements at Aldgate Station and exploration of the feasibility of a direct interchange between Aldgate and Aldgate East stations
    • Extending the Metropolitan Line to Watford Junction and the Bakerloo Line to Lewisham
    • The delivery of more high-quality cycling routes to and through central London including Quietways and Cycle Superhighways
    • Improved walking connections to boroughs neighbouring the City

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  48. Proposal 48 Support the increased use of the Thames for passenger services

    We will work with partners including TfL River Services, the Port of London Authority and riverboat operators to increase the use of the River Thames for passenger services. Activities will include promotion of river services, enhancing walking routes to Blackfriars and Tower piers and improving overall pier efficiency. We will explore the potential to reinstate Swan Lane pier for leisure and passenger services.

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  49. Proposal 49 Review bus provision across the City

    We will support TfL’s ambitions to adjust bus services in Central London, taking account of the forecast fall in demand following the opening of the Elizabeth Line.

    We will work with TfL to improve bus journey times to and connectivity through the Square Mile by:

    • Reviewing bus routing and frequency throughout the City to optimise routing
    • Introducing targeted junction improvements to enhance bus priority
    • Identifying opportunities to improve bus priority

    The key routes for bus priority measures are shown below. Improvements to these routes will be delivered by 2030.

    We will support TfL’s ambitions to adjust bus services in Central London, taking account of the forecast fall in demand following the opening of the Elizabeth Line.

    We will work with TfL to improve bus journey times to and connectivity through the Square Mile by:

    • Reviewing bus routing and frequency throughout the City to optimise routing
    • Introducing targeted junction improvements to enhance bus priority
    • Identifying opportunities to improve bus priority when developing and implementing Healthy Streets plans (see Proposal 12) and major projects

    The key routes for bus priority measures are shown below. Improvements to these routes will be delivered by 2030.

    Potential bus priority network

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  50. Proposal 50 Support the Mayor of London in retaining locally-generated taxation

    We will support the Mayor of London and TfL’s efforts to retain additional locally-generated taxation, such as vehicle excise duty, to fund investment in transport infrastructure across the Capital, including investment to help deliver the outcomes of this Strategy.

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  51. Proposal 51 Encourage continued Government investment in major London transport projects

    We will continue to encourage the Government to invest directly in strategic Healthy Streets projects and programmes and large transport infrastructure projects, such as Crossrail 2. Significant investment across Greater London is required to ensure the Capital remains an attractive place to live, work, study and invest and protect the significant contribution London makes to the national economy.

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  52. Proposal 52 Use temporary interventions and trials to accelerate the pace of delivery

    Delivering changes to our streets can take time. We will use temporary and experimental measures to quickly deliver functional changes to our streets and allow people to begin enjoying the benefits of change as we work towards full delivery. If appropriate, will also use temporary interventions to ‘live trial’ major change, allowing proposal to be tested and, where necessary, refined. This approach will allow people to better understand the nature of proposed changes and provide feedback based on real experience.

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  53. Proposal 53 Improve our monitoring of transport in the Square Mile

    We will improve the quantity and quality of data we hold on transport in the City by:

    • Exploring the potential to improve our City-wide database of vehicular and pedestrian traffic counts by increasing count locations and the number of count days
    • Repeating the City Streets survey every two years to understand what people who live and work in, or travel through the Square Mile think about transport and streets in the City
    • Exploring the potential to gather ongoing feedback through web or app-based surveys and interactive maps
    • Making best use of technological advancements in sensors and other monitoring methods to improve both the quality and the quantity of data we collect, reduce of the cost of data collection, and increase the speed of data processing
    • Sharing data with other organisations that collect metrics on relevant indicators

    Some of the data used for monitoring and evaluating the Strategy will be provided by outside organisations. We will engage with these data owners and sources to review our targets and performance indicators as new datasets become available, and work with them to obtain data and information that is appropriate, up to date, and reliable.

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  54. Proposal 54 Support change across London that is aligned with this Strategy

    The Square Mile does not exist in isolation and change across the Capital is required to maintain City’s attractiveness as a place to live, work, learn and visit. We will support projects and initiatives delivered by TfL and London’s boroughs that align with the vision, aims and outcomes of this Strategy. We will also support changes to relevant national policy and legislation that will positively impact on transport in and connections to London.

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